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Feasibility of supporting newly qualified nurses: Nominal group technique of the perspectives of nursing stakeholders

  • Kristen Ranse
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, 1 Parklands Drive, Southport QLD 4215, Tell: (07) 555 29578.
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing & Midwifery, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, 1 Parklands Drive, Southport QLD Australia

    Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, 1 Parklands Drive, Southport QLD Australia
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  • Belinda Gray
    Affiliations
    Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service, Gold Coast, 1 Hospital Boulevard, Southport QLD 4215, Australia
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  • Sara McMillan
    Affiliations
    Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, 1 Parklands Drive, Southport QLD Australia

    School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, 1 Parklands Drive, Southport QLD Australia
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  • Letitia Del Fabbro
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing & Midwifery, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, 1 Parklands Drive, Southport QLD Australia
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  • Susanne Pearce
    Affiliations
    Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service, Gold Coast, 1 Hospital Boulevard, Southport QLD 4215, Australia

    College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Level 1, Room N103, Sturt North Sturt Rd, Bedford Park SA 5042, Australia
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  • Rachel Wardrop
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing & Midwifery, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, 1 Parklands Drive, Southport QLD Australia
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  • Lyn Armit
    Affiliations
    Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service, Gold Coast, 1 Hospital Boulevard, Southport QLD 4215, Australia
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  • Laurie Grealish
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing & Midwifery, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, 1 Parklands Drive, Southport QLD Australia

    Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, 1 Parklands Drive, Southport QLD Australia

    Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service, Gold Coast, 1 Hospital Boulevard, Southport QLD 4215, Australia
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      ABSTRACT

      Background

      As the health industry grows, integration of newly qualified nurses into the workplace is critical to workforce sustainability. In one health service, a work-based student learning program, the Collaborative Clusters Education Model, was extended to support newly qualified nurses in their transition to the workplace.

      Aim

      To describe the feasibility of the Collaborative Clusters Education Model to support newly qualified nurses.

      Design

      Evaluative methodology using Nominal Group Technique.

      Methods

      Convenience and snowball sampling were used to recruit participants from three stakeholder groups: clinical nurse facilitators (two groups: n1 = 7; n2 = 5), nurse leaders (n = 9) and practice partners, registered nurses who support with newly qualified nurses (n = 5). Groups provided nominal rankings of ideas (quantitative data) and group discussions were recorded and professionally transcribed (qualitative data). Data analysis involved three stages: i) quantitative analysis; ii) qualitative analysis and iii) synthesising qualitative and quantitative data to create meaning.

      Results

      The priorities focused broadly on the challenges associated with individual and organisational capacity to support newly qualified nurses. In addition to capacity, clinical facilitator capability, teamwork and communication, and role ambiguity were identified as key issues.

      Conclusions

      The feasibility of supporting newly qualified nurses via the Collaborative Clusters Education Model would be enhanced with improved alignment between stakeholder roles and responsibilities. In contemporary workplaces, characterised by distributed responsibility for learning support, there is a need for increased role clarity across the stakeholder team. Furthermore, the need for improved access to experienced mentors points to the potential of team-based models of nursing care delivery.

      Keywords

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