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Enablers and barriers to engaging in dementia-specific education: A cross-sectional survey

  • Ruth Williams
    Affiliations
    Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research - Monash Health Partnership, Monash Health, 246 Clayton Road, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Victoria; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Institute for Health Transformation, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria, 3125, Australia
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  • Cherene Ockerby
    Affiliations
    Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research - Monash Health Partnership, Monash Health, 246 Clayton Road, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Victoria; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Institute for Health Transformation, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria, 3125, Australia
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  • Bernice Redley
    Affiliations
    Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research - Monash Health Partnership, Monash Health, 246 Clayton Road, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Victoria; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Institute for Health Transformation, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria, 3125, Australia
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  • Author Footnotes
    # Currently works at Monash University, Nursing and Midwifery, 35 Rainforest Walk, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
    Helen Rawson
    Footnotes
    # Currently works at Monash University, Nursing and Midwifery, 35 Rainforest Walk, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
    Affiliations
    Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research - Monash Health Partnership, Monash Health, 246 Clayton Road, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Victoria; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Institute for Health Transformation, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria, 3125, Australia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Alison M. Hutchinson
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: 75 Pigdons Rd, Geelong, Victoria 3216, Australia Tel.: +61 392446446.
    Affiliations
    Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research - Monash Health Partnership, Monash Health, 246 Clayton Road, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Victoria; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Institute for Health Transformation, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria, 3125, Australia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    # Currently works at Monash University, Nursing and Midwifery, 35 Rainforest Walk, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
Published:January 30, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.colegn.2022.01.007

      Abstract

      Background

      Prevalence of dementia is increasing, with more than half of aged care residents having a dementia diagnosis in Australia. Aged care staff currently lack dementia-specific knowledge and skills to care for residents with dementia.

      Aim

      To examine residential aged care staff perceptions of enablers and barriers to completing dementia-specific education.

      Methods

      A purpose-designed cross-sectional survey of staff (n=179) from 36 of the 177 Victorian public sector residential aged care facilities across metropolitan, regional, and rural Victoria, Australia.

      Findings

      Staff were most commonly motivated to complete dementia-specific education by intrinsic factors such as a desire to provide better care to residents, and to develop or improve their skills. Availability of education online, readily accessible information about education opportunities, workplace resources, and management support were key enablers. Difficulty with access, lack of time, high workload, and lack of awareness were significant barriers. Cost, location, and mode of delivery were cited as both enablers and barriers.

      Discussion

      Residential aged care staff require accessible education initiatives and workplace support to facilitate their participation in dementia-specific education to provide high quality, evidence-based care for people living with dementia.

      Conclusion

      Findings of this study can assist education providers, employers, and researchers to better understand participation and inform strategies and processes to increase uptake of dementia-specific education.

      Keywords

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